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INRA
24, chemin de Borde Rouge –Auzeville – CS52627
31326 Castanet Tolosan CEDEX - France

Dernière mise à jour : Mai 2018

Menu Logo Principal Rowett

Gut microbiology

Program

Monday 20 June

18:00     Registration and pre-conference mixer

Tuesday 21 June

09:00 – 09:10         Welcome and opening remarks

SESSION 1: RECENT ADVANCES IN GUT MICROBIAL DIVERSITY AND FUNCTION

Chaired by Alan WALKER & Evelyne FORANO

09:10 - 09:50

INVITED LECTURE

L1

Functional analysis of the gut microbiota using single cell isotope probing
David BERRY - Austria

09:50 - 10:30

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O1

The hidden allies: microbes associated with the gut of a specialist beetle
Pol ALONSO-PERNAS - Germany

O2

Intestinal microbiome landscape of Western adults - Phylogenetic core and its functionality
Sudarshan A. SHETTY - Finland

10:30 - 11:10

Coffee break

11:10 - 12:30

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O3

The mouse intestinal bacterial collection (miBC): host-specific insight into cultivable diversity and genomic novelty of the mouse gut microbiome
Thomas CLAVEL - Germany

O4

Respiratory support and antibiotic treatment in preterm infants delays colonisation by anaerobic symbionts
Romy D. ZWITTINK - The Netherlands

O5

Metatranscriptomics for novel glycoside hydrolase enzyme discovery from the rumen of muskoxen
Robert J. FORSTER - Canada

12:10 - 12:30

BREAKING NEWS - SESSION 1

BN1

Capturing the diversity of fungal population in human colonic microbiota through culture-dependent and independent approaches
Caterina GOZZOLI - Italy

BN2

Effect of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on gut environmental condition of mice with human gut-derived microbiota
Hirosuke SUGAHARA - Japan 

BN3

Rumen derived antimicrobials as a solution to evolving and persistent clinical infections
Linda B. OYAMA - UK

BN4

Zebrafish gut as a house for human intestinal bacteria
Nerea ARIAS-JAYO - Spain

12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 15:00

Poster session

15:30 - 16:00

Coffee break

16:00 - 16:15

FEMS Presentation - Grzegorz Wegrzyn - Poland

SESSION 2: MICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND METABOLISM

Chaired by Petra LOUIS & Pascale MOSONI

16:20 - 17:00

INVITED LECTURE

L2

Microbe-microbe interactions in the rumen, from the simple to the complex
Bryan A. WHITE - USA

17:00 - 18:00

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O6

Polysaccharide utilization loci and nutritional specialization in a dominant group of butyrate-producing human colonic Firmicutes
Paul O. SHERIDAN - UK

O7

Metagenomics distribution of cellulosome-related elements in the bovine rumen
Sarah MORAIS - Israel

O8

The role of lactate-utilizing bacteria community in infant gastrointestinal discomfort
V. T. PHAM - Switzerland

EVENING

"Fête de la Musique" in Clermont-Ferrand

 Wednesday 22 June  

 SESSION 2: MICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND METABOLISM (continued)

09:00 - 10:00

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O9

Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut
Henrik M. ROAGER - Denmark

O10

The dog that did not bark: A metabolite story
Amy S. VAN WEY - New Zealand

09:40 - 10:00

BREAKING NEWS - SESSION 2

BN5

Metabolomics to decipher gut microbiota derived metabolites
Alesia WALKER - Germany

BN6

A deeper exploration of fiber degradation by the human intestinal microbiota
Orlane PATRASCU -  France

BN7

Metagenomic datamining reveals microbial populations responsible for trimethylamine formation in the human gut
Eleanor JAMESON - UK

BN8

Butyrigenic fermentation of lysine and fructoselysine by Intestinimonas butyriciproducens in the human colon
Nam T.P. BUI - The Netherlands

10:00 - 10:40

Coffee break

SESSION 3: CROSSTALK BETWEEN THE GUT MICROBIOTA AND THE HOST

Chaired by Silvia GRATZ & Annick BERNALIER-DONADILLE

10:40 - 11:20

INVITED LECTURE

L3

Inter-kingdom communication within the gut microbiome
Primrose FREESTONE – UK

11:20 - 12:00

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O11

Behavioural testing alters the caecal microbiota in Sprague-Dawley and Wistar Kyoto rats
Wayne YOUNG - New Zealand

O12

The N-acetylglucosamine sensor NagC contributes to intestinal colonization by enterohemorrhagic E. coli through direct regulation of LEE gene expression
Grégory JUBELIN - France

O13

The human microbiota in health and disease: the role of quorum sensing peptides
Evelien WYNENDAELE - Belgium

12:20 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 15:30

Poster Session

15:30 - 16:00

Coffee break

16:00 - 17:00

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O14

A differential microbial colonization pattern due to different milk feeding regimes in early life does not trigger differences in gene expression levels at the rumen epithelium
David YANEZ-RUIZ - Spain

O15

Role of rumen microbiome in the development of pre-ruminant rumen
Le Luo GUAN - Canada

16:40 - 17:00

BREAKING NEWS - SESSION 3

BN9

Sulphides and pain: role of sulphate-reducing bacteria in visceral hypersensitivity in Irritable bowel syndrome patients
Laureen CROUZET - France

BN10

Long-term impacts of early life antibiotic exposure on metabolic development
Benjamin P. WILLING - Canada

BN11

Gut-derived Coriobacteriaceae increase white adipose tissue deposition in mice
Thomas CLAVEL - Germany

18:30 - 20:00

Council Reception at Clermont-Fd City Hall

20:30

Gala dinner at Casino Royat

Thursday 23 June       

SESSION 4: INTERPLAY BETWEEN GUT MICROBIOME AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Chaired by John WALLACE & Milka POPOVA

09:00 - 09:40

INVITED LECTURE

L4

The ruminant gut microbiome and its relationship with the environment
Stuart DENMAN - Australia

09:40 - 10:20

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O16

Meta-transcriptome analysis of the rumen microbiome in response to nitrate addition reveals the role of oxidative stress in the reduction in methane emissions from cattle
Christopher J. CREEVEY - United Kingdom

O17

Impacts of the methanogen inhibitor 3-NOP on the rumen microbial community in cattle fed a tropical roughage hay
G. MARTINEZ-FERNANDEZ - Australia

10:20 - 11:00

Coffee break

11:00 - 11:40

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O18

Methane production in dairy cows correlates with methanogenic and bacterial community structure in rumen
R. DANIELSSON -  Sweden

O9

First microbial gene catalog and antibiotic resistome of rabbit gut microbiota established by metagenomic sequencing
Olivier ZEMB - France

11:40 - 11:55

BREAKING NEWS - SESSION 4

BN12

Analysis of functionally active methanogens in rumen liquid digesta of cattle undergoing dietary restriction and subsequent compensatory growth
Emily M. McGOVERN - Ireland

BN13

Investigation of the rumen metavirome reveals variation between naturally high and low methane emitting animals
Thomas HITCH - UK

BN14

Benzo[A]Pyrene impacts the volatile metabolome and transcriptome of human gut microbiota
Clémence DEFOIS - France

11:55 - 12:25

“Twenty years & counting …”– Conference by the pioneers of the INRA – Rowett symposium
Jean-Pierre JOUANY, John WALLACE, Gérard FONTY, Harry FLINT – France, UK

12:25 - 14:00

Lunch

SESSION 5: IMPACT OF DIET ON GUT MICROBIOTA

Chaired by Karen SCOTT & Diego MORGAVI

14:00 - 14:40

INVITED LECTURE

L5

Microbial strategies for exploiting polysaccharide energy sources in the human colon
Harry J. FLINT - UK

14:40 - 15:20

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O20

Modulation of the gut microbiota by distinct unavailable carbohydrates is dependent on the pre-existing microbial profile
Christian HOFFMANN - Brazil

O21

Quantity and quality of protein intake alter gut microbiota activity and impact large intestine mucosa in overweight humans
Martin BEAUMONT - France

15:20 - 15:50

Coffee break

15:50 - 16:30

ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

O22

Diet-induced changes of redox potential underlie compositional shifts in the rumen microbiome
Itzhak MIZRAHI - Israel

O23

Infant gut microbiota development is driven by transition to family foods independent of maternal obesity
Martin FREDERIK LAURSEN - Denmark

16:30 - 16:50

BREAKING NEWS - SESSION 5

BN15

Impact of diet on development of the gastrointestinal tract and its associated microbiota in dairy calves
Kimberly A. DILL-MCFARLAND - USA

BN16

Food structure impacts digestion and gut microbiota composition
Daphné JAOUI - France

BN17

Effect of dietary supplementation, with linseed oil, in early life on the ruminal microbial community structure of lambs
Tamsin LYONS - Ireland

BN18

Adaptation of the pig´s fecal microbiota in response to different diets shows short-term changes in the structural and functional composition
Jana SEIFERT - Germany

16:50 - 17:00

Meeting wrap up – introduce 2018 Rowett-INRA meeting

17:30 - 19:30

Free tourist tour in Clermont-Ferrand

See also

Dowload the scientific program